2018 Washington State Healthy Youth Survey

Discovery High School will be participating in the 2018 Washington State Healthy Youth Survey on October 12, 2018.  The survey asks questions about risks for injury, health outcomes, and alcohol and drug use.  Schools, and state and local agencies use survey results to support our youth and reduce their risks. The Healthy Youth Survey is voluntary and anonymous and provides important information to guide policy and programs that serve our youth.

An information sheet was sent home with students in grades 10th and 12th on Friday, September 14.  Parent and Student Information letter can also be found at www.AskHYS.net/Administration

 

2018-09-19T15:30:27+00:00 September 19th, 2018|

Fall 2018 Principal Update

I am grateful to return as the Principal of Discovery High School. We aspire to nothing less than becoming the premier alternative high school in the State of Washington.

I spent last year getting to know everybody, from students to teachers and the community of Longview. I stand by my words of last year, that we have a, “highly professional, ferociously dedicated staff.” Nothing could be more true. Our teachers are the heart of what we do here, and I’ve seen them do amazing work with our kids.

Last June we graduated 49 young women and men. 49! That is a testament to our kids’ hard work and our staff’s dedication. That was 7 x 7… maybe our slogan should be 8 x 8 ?

Thanks, again, for entrusting us with your kids’ education. We will honor that trust by making our best effort to see them across the finish line.

Best Wishes,
Mike Kleiner

2018-09-12T20:04:22+00:00 September 12th, 2018|

Phone-free classrooms for 2018-2019

How Yondr worksThis year we will be using a system called “Yondr,” to improve teaching and learning by making our classes phone-free.

We know how connected people are to their phones, but phone use in school has become too distracting. Too many kids miss credits because they can’t focus in class. We can’t get them graduated if we can’t get their attention.

More and more studies prove that cell phones interfere with a student’s academic success. Just last year (2017), the University of Texas at Austin concluded that “the mere presence of cellphones reduces available cognitive capacity.”

The way Yondr works is simple.  When students enter Discovery, they will place their phones in an assigned Yondr cell-phone pouch.  The pouch locks and the student keeps their pouch with them.  Students maintain possession of their cell-phones throughout the class period, but they will not be able to use them until they are unlocked.  

In an effort to best serve your child, we are asking for your support in the adoption of Yondr at Discovery. It is already used by hundreds of middle and high schools, corporations and artists across the world to improve focus, production and the overall human experience of its users.

We know that this will be a big change.  Thank you for supporting our school and our students as we move forward.

You may contact the Discovery office at 360.414.2926.  Parents!!! Please don’t call/message your student during class time. In most cases, you can contact the office the relay messages to your student when action needs to be taken during the school day.

If it is crucial that a student respond immediately, students can unlock pouches in the classroom. In the case of an emergency, such as an earthquake, teachers have devices that can unlock the Yondr pouches quickly.

Students are still in possession of their cell phones.

The pouch is a school issued supply, just like textbooks.  It is free to use, but the student is responsible to pay $50 in the event of damage or loss. It is like a book fine.

2018-08-29T20:39:58+00:00 August 21st, 2018|

LPS celebrates summer reading!

Longview Public Schools Superintendent Dan Zorn and School Board member Phil Jurmu set the pace at Longview’s Go Fourth parade.

While serving as grand marshal of the 2018 Go Fourth parade, Superintendent Dan Zorn and his crew of LPS staff, board members, family and friends passed out thousands of bookmarks encouraging everyone to read this summer.

The bookmarks include a link to “Superintendent Storytime,” where Dr. Zorn shares several of his favorite children’s books.

 

2018-07-09T15:04:58+00:00 July 5th, 2018|

LPS graduates take diverse paths: Becky Grubbs, MMHS

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

MMHS grad Becky Grubbs

Mark Morris grad Becky Grubbs

Mark Morris High School: Hardwired to help

Becky Grubbs seems hardwired for volunteering.

“I’ve been doing non-profit work since I was 18 months old,” said
the senior, describing those early times with her grandparents
at FISH of Cowlitz County, which distributes food and other services.

This year and last, Becky received Volunteer of the Year honors from the Cowlitz-Wahkiakum United Way.

Becky began volunteering at the United Way as a sophomore and soon was helping plan events, like the Day of Caring campaign. This year she worked with LPS to implement a literacy program that put 100 Mark Morris and R.A. Long students in third grade classrooms where they encouraged the younger students to read for fun.

“Becky took it on as her pet project … and set up student teams at the high schools,” said Brooke Fisher-Clark, United Way executive director. “It was really magical to see that partnership.”

Becky said volunteer work has taught her that there is always a way to help.

“United Way really helped me find out how to contribute,” she said.

Next steps: Finish an associate’s degree in business at Lower Columbia College and then pursue a four-year degree to become a financial planner or accountant.

Advice for younger students: “I would suggest they look for opportunities for things they can do in their own community. There’s always some way to help. You can always find something to do.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez .

Click here to read about R.A. Long graduate Hamzah Amjad.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T21:54:19+00:00 June 21st, 2018|

LPS grads take diverse paths: Hamzah Amjad, R.A. Long

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

R.A. Long High School: Intent on STEM

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

From Hamzah Amjad’s perspective, having technology isn’t enough.

“It can be used to solve most of the world’s problems,” he said. “We just haven’t yet figured out how to help people who need it.”

Hamzah is preparing to do just that. In April, he was among 49 Washington high school seniors—one from each legislative district—who signed letters of intent to pursue careers in STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In September, he will begin engineering studies at the University of Washington.

“I like things that manifest into real-life scenarios,” he said, describing how his calculus and AP statistics classes helped him see real-world applications for theoretical material.

Hamzah points to medicines that are designed to cure cancer but perhaps aren’t used in the most efficient way. And he mused about artificial intelligence in cars—couldn’t it be used to prevent vehicle accidents?

His teachers anticipate he will make a difference.

“Hamzah is a phenomenal person who is always ‘on his game,’ and he carries himself with a humility that people are drawn to,” said math teacher Paul Jeffries. “He is committed to his future and will be successful, because he doesn’t know how else to be.”

Next steps: Study engineering at University of Washington.

Advice for younger students: “Everyone’s different, so you have to find your own way … but ask for help if you need it.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez.

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T21:58:35+00:00 June 21st, 2018|

LPS graduates take diverse paths: Natalie Rodriguez, Discovery

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

Discovery High School: Finding her wings

DHS grad Natalie Rodriguez

Discovery grad Natalie Rodriguez

After moving back to Longview from Texas in her sophomore year, Natalie Rodriguez’s plan was to finish high school online so she could avoid people.

Then the self-described “really, really shy” student heard about Discovery, Longview’s alternative high school, and gave it a try.

When Natalie was required to make her first presentation, Discovery teacher Tamra Higgins nudged her through it.

“Ms. Higgins was like, ‘It’ll be OK. You’ll be fine,’” Natalie recalled—and found out she was.

She continued trying new things, including a library science class at R.A. Long and volunteer work at Monticello Middle School. Along the way, she found a passion for libraries.

“I realized if you work in a library, you’re helping people,” she said.
“Libraries are like hospitals for the mind.”

Higgins and English teacher Ron Moore agreed that Natalie has evolved into a whole new student.

“Natalie consistently asked some of the best questions and offered the deepest and most sophisticated insights,” Moore said. “She became a class leader and risk taker—miles away from that timid girl who was hesitant to put her toe in the water.”

Next steps: Start at Lower Columbia College, preparing for a career as a library technician.

Advice for younger students:
“If you’re on a cliff and you need to jump, but you’re too scared to jump, find some wings, staple them on—and just jump.”

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

Click here to read about R.A. Long graduate Hamzah Amjad.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T21:52:45+00:00 June 21st, 2018|

Discovery Summer 2018 information

Office open by appointment

Summer programs:
• Summer School, June 18-June 28; Monday – Thursday

Meals for Longview kids:
Northlake Elem, 2210 Olympia Way
June 18 – August 17 (no meals July 2-6); Monday – Friday
Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45am, Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm

Kessler Elem, 1902 Kessler Blvd
June 18 – August 17 (no meals July 4); Monday – Friday
Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45am, Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm

CVG Elem, 2644 30th Ave
July 9 – July 27; Monday – Friday
Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45am, Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm Cancelled

Olympic Elem, 1324 30th Ave
July 9 – July 27; Monday – Friday
Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45am Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm
Aug 7 – Aug 16; Tuesday – Thursday
Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45am Lunch 11:00 – 11:15pm

St Helens Elem, 431 27th Ave
July 9 – July 27; Monday – Friday
Breakfast 8:30 – 8:45am, Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm

Monticello Middle School, 1225 28th Ave
July 9 – July 27; Monday – Friday
Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm

Archie Anderson Park, 22nd Ave and Alabama St
July 9 – Aug 16; Monday – Thursday
Lunch 12:00 – 12:15pm, Snack 3:00 – 3:15pm

Longview Teen Center, 2121 Kessler Blvd
June 18 – Aug 17 (no meals July 2-6); Monday – Friday
Snack 3:00 – 3:15

Office opens in fall: August 20, 2018 (earlier by appointment)

First day of school: August 29, 2018

2018-08-17T19:21:55+00:00 June 19th, 2018|

NASA summer camps offer great opportunity for high school students

Cowlitz County high school students, including incoming freshmen and just-graduated seniors, are invited to experience “Terra Trackers” and “Rockets and Space”. These week-long summer camps at R.A. Long High School will allow students to work with electronics, robotics, and rocketry. There is no charge to attend.

“Terra Trackers”: July 16 – 19.  Read more about the camp, and complete the application.  Completed applications may be returned to the ASB office at R.A. Long, or scanned and emailed to Hanna Burleson.  Applications due July 15.

“Rockets and Space” is July 30-August 2.  Read more about the camp, and complete the application. Completed applications may be returned to R.A. Long Main Office, or scanned and emailed to Hanna Burleson. Applications due July 27.

 

2018-07-26T21:23:17+00:00 June 18th, 2018|
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